Healthy Aging Requires a Balanced Posture

Healthy golferNearly all of us began our lives with naturally balanced posture. Yet, along the way, we modeled the posture of others, spent our days inactive and, over time, transformed our beautifully designed musculoskeletal systems into an imbalanced, overworked, and often-painful body framework. If we want to be healthy as we age, learning how to balance our postures and mechanics is essential.

When our bodies are not properly balanced, there are several consequences:

  • Our joints don’t move fluidly, may lose some of their natural range of motion and suffer needless wear and tear because our bones don’t track properly. This can contribute to both a reduction in function as well as pain or debilitating conditions such as osteoarthritis (more…)

Vacation is good for your back

Vacations are good for back pain

If you’re looking for a reason to go on a vacation this year, add this one to the list: it’s good for your back.

Why is vacation good for your back? Because it addresses three of the reasons that your back hurts.

First, one of the most significant contributors to back pain is stress. And not the type of stress that is a major event that causes a big stress response and demands some type of response. No, the way that stress leads to back pain is those daily pain-in-the-neck stressors like commuting to work, getting both you and the family out of the house in a timely manner day after day, or dealing with the daily frustrations of the workplace.

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A Comprehensive, Root-cause Approach to Back Pain

Being free of back pain means doing the things you love

We’ve all heard people talk about how “their back went out”. Something like, I slipped on a wet floor and my back went out, or I bent down to pick up a sock and my back went out. Or maybe there was an event, such as an automobile accident, athletic event, or maybe it started at work. In many – most, actually – cases, the pain just started with no specific triggering event.

It seems intuitive to attribute the pain to the event that occurred at its start. However, with back pain it’s usually more of a “last straw”, in that there were things that you were doing on a regular basis that actually led to the “triggering event”. Primary contributing factors include inadequate movement, imbalanced postural mechanics, and stress; there are also several secondary factors. (more…)

Why does my back really hurt?

Why does my back really hurt?

We’ve all heard people talk about how “their back went out”. Something like, I slipped on a toy and my back went out, or I bent down to pick up a sock and my back went out. Or maybe there was an event, such as an automobile accident, athletic event or maybe it started at work. I think of this not as the “injury”, but as the “triggering event”, meaning that this event did not cause the pain, but designates the time that the pain began.

What many may not understand is that, in most cases, it was not the event that caused the pain, rather the contributing factors that were in play before the initial onset. (more…)

Address Back Pain at its Root Cause Level for Long-term Relief

tree-rootsWe’ve all heard people talk about how they hurt their back. “I slipped in the shower and my back went out”, they may say, or “I bent down to pick something up and now I have a bad back .” Or maybe there was an event, such as an automobile accident, athletic event or maybe it began at work.

Think of this initial experience of back pain not as an ‘injury’ per se, but rather as a ‘triggering event’, meaning that this event did not likely lead to long-term pain, rather reflects the time that the pain began.

What many may not be aware of is that, in nearly all cases of chronic back pain, it was not the initial event that is to blame for the long-term pain, rather the ‘contributing factors’ that were present before the initial onset, and the ways that the person responds to the pain. (more…)